NP

Neaton & Puklich, P.L.L.P.

952-314-5779 Or Toll Free 877-813-4764 For A Free Initial Consultation
Jump To Services.

July 2013 Archives

Is fired Minnesota Senate aide a victim of gender discrimination?

Discrimination in the workplace is never legal. Whether that discrimination is based on gender, religion, sexual orientation or race, it is important that employees who face discrimination stand up for their legal rights. This may include filing a lawsuit against the offending party.

Is fired Minnesota Senate aide a victim of gender discrimination?

Discrimination in the workplace is never legal. Whether that discrimination is based on gender, religion, sexual orientation or race, it is important that employees who face discrimination stand up for their legal rights. This may include filing a lawsuit against the offending party.

Major company's memo illustrates blatant race discrimination

As many employers and workers in Minnesota know, promoting awareness and compassion among all employees is an important step to guaranteeing a discrimination-free work environment. However, efforts to create a productive and healthy workplace can only be truly effective if they are sincere and unbiased. If not, the very steps intended to encourage neutrality may actually reinforce prejudice. Unfortunately, some employees of a leading retailer may have been singled out by misguided efforts to inhibit race discrimination.

Major company's memo illustrates blatant race discrimination

As many employers and workers in Minnesota know, promoting awareness and compassion among all employees is an important step to guaranteeing a discrimination-free work environment. However, efforts to create a productive and healthy workplace can only be truly effective if they are sincere and unbiased. If not, the very steps intended to encourage neutrality may actually reinforce prejudice. Unfortunately, some employees of a leading retailer may have been singled out by misguided efforts to inhibit race discrimination.

State Supreme Court agrees to rehear gender discrimination case

Defining what actually constitutes illegal mistreatment in the workplace can be very difficult in some instances. In Minnesota and other states around the country, employers typically have a certain degree of freedom to make employment decisions at their own discretion. And given that many workplace environments place employers and staff in close proximity to one another, it is not uncommon for issues to arise between boss and employee. One gender discrimination lawsuit is testing the legal system, as the highest court in one state is reconsidering its previous ruling on the issue and fueling controversy in the process.

State Supreme Court agrees to rehear gender discrimination case

Defining what actually constitutes illegal mistreatment in the workplace can be very difficult in some instances. In Minnesota and other states around the country, employers typically have a certain degree of freedom to make employment decisions at their own discretion. And given that many workplace environments place employers and staff in close proximity to one another, it is not uncommon for issues to arise between boss and employee. One gender discrimination lawsuit is testing the legal system, as the highest court in one state is reconsidering its previous ruling on the issue and fueling controversy in the process.

Workplace discrimination rulings set disappointing precedence

Acts of mistreatment play out in workplaces across the state of Minnesota and around the country every day. Employees often know that they have encountered inappropriate behavior when it happens, but sometimes it can be difficult to say whether or not that behavior is actually illegal. In the event that a lower court’s workplace discrimination ruling is contested, the U.S. Supreme Court decides on how employment law and discrimination legislation should be interpreted. Two recent rulings made by the country’s highest court may affect future cases around the country and leave some victims with little legal recourse.

Workplace discrimination rulings set disappointing precedence

Acts of mistreatment play out in workplaces across the state of Minnesota and around the country every day. Employees often know that they have encountered inappropriate behavior when it happens, but sometimes it can be difficult to say whether or not that behavior is actually illegal. In the event that a lower court’s workplace discrimination ruling is contested, the U.S. Supreme Court decides on how employment law and discrimination legislation should be interpreted. Two recent rulings made by the country’s highest court may affect future cases around the country and leave some victims with little legal recourse.